Category: Straw bale


Private Residence

1st May

This owner-built, two-storey, straw bale private residence was completed in late 2013. The house sits on a modified concrete grade beam and pile system with concrete floors and radiant heating. The home is situtation on a lovely lot near Telford Lake in Leduc, Alberta.


Straw Bale and Energy-Efficient Infill in Edmonton

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. 2 comments

25th February

Supporting infill in established neighbourhoods is part of our mandate in designing and developing straw bale and energy-efficient frame single and multi-family housing. This includes duplexes, semi-detached, row houses and garage suites where zoning allows. The most obvious benefit of this type of infill is the reduction of urban sprawl and the opportunity for individuals and families to live close to the core of the city.

This type of development can fill gaps in the existing built environment and often plays a significant role in the long term sustainability of many communities. For neighbourhoods close to downtown it can provide housing stock that is more suitable for families. Benefits include the efficient use of land, use of existing civic infrastructure and services, and improve quality of life and real estate values in older communities if properly design and built. We hope … Read More »


Basic Straw Bale Specifications

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. No Comments

17th December

Some of the most frequently asked questions regarding straw bale buildings are those related to the type and specifications of the bales that should be selected. The following 5 points will hopefully address many of the questions first time straw bale and owner builders have when confronting the question of bales.

There continues to be much debate surrounding some of the issues such as the type of straw (fiber). Remember, straw is the stems of grain and cereal crops – not to be confused with hay which is grass and legumes which is used as animal feed. The recommendations set out here are based on real world experience from our design team and builders and the performance of the buildings we design and build.

Moisture content. The drier the better! Anything below 18% is acceptable. Bales in the 12 to … Read More »


The Evolving Straw Bale House

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. 1 Comment

8th March

In previous postings we have discussed some of the design rationale and construction methodologies employed and advocated by our company. This is a more detailed analysis of technologies and materials used from foundation to roof.

Not too long ago the construction of a straw bale house involved the design of a custom foundation, sometimes complex and unorthodox framing, shimming trusses and rafters on an undulating box beam on a load bearing straw bale wall, and a host of other quirky construction methods not often encountered by professional builders and home owners. Part to our mandate has been to make straw bale construction simpler and more accessible.

Most of the homes we design are constructed on conventional basements; an eight inch concrete wall and strip footings with a standard I joist floor system. This is the same foundation most standard … Read More »


Non-Load Bearing vs. Load Bearing Straw Bale

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. No Comments

24th February

There are essentially two methods of constructing bale walls to support the roof structure and multi-storey walls (to a maximum of 3 storeys) in residential construction. They are:

load bearing wall assemblies
non-load bearing wall assemblies

Both systems have their advantages and challenges. We have chosen to focus our efforts on non-load bearing straw bale for a number of reasons. Moisture is the biggest enemy of straw bales during construction, and until a roof is constructed the bales are vulnerable to damage even when stuccoed. Load bearing bale walls must be compressed, leveled and stuccoed before second floor or roof assemblies are constructed.

Both non-load bearing and load bearing walls can be constructed on conventional basements with an engineered i-joist floor system, grade beams, reinforced slabs and rubble trench foundations. It is at this point the construction methodologies diverge.

Non-load bearing … Read More »


Straw Bale Building for the DIY Crowd

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. No Comments

15th February

Straw bales as a choice in new housing is distinctly different from virtually all new products developed to enhance the efficiency of home construction from a structural, energy, environmental or cost efficiency perspective. New building products are often developed by large companies through research and development, then marketed, branded and patented. Straw bale, and its applications in house construction, is a grass roots technology, developed by small builders, home owners and ‘do-it-yourself-ers’ exploring a means of providing housing that is cost effective using local, renewable materials for energy-efficient, healthy homes.

Testing in Canada by CMHC and other housing certification agencies in the United States (with ASTM testing) have confirmed and quantified the many exceptional qualities of straw bale construction such as fire resistance, insulation properties, and sound attenuation. The technology is not propitiatory, brandable or patentable by any individual … Read More »


Dispelling Myths Around Straw Bale Construction

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. No Comments

6th February

The two most common questions we encounter from individuals exploring straw bales as a building option are: “Do they pose a fire hazard?” and “Are they going to be a haven for mice and vermin?” This is a cursory overview of both issues which we will be dealing with in much more detail in future postings.

Straw bales are naturally fire resistant. The dry straw that makes up the bale is very combustible when loose, but compressed in the form of a bale, the straw does not trap enough air to allow easy or rapid combustion. Building-grade bales will burn and char on the surface but their density resists combustion. Straw bales are never left exposed on any sides in a properly designed straw bale building. There is a layer of cement-lime stucco on both sides of the walls along with … Read More »


McKernan Duo

19th October

 

Introducing our latest straw bale infill project in Edmonton! The McKernan Duo project was designed for local developer Kanoo Developments and is now under construction at 10973 76 Avenue.

Form and function marry environmental responsibility. It features open floor plans to encourage family, entertaining and accommodate more intimate spaces. Transitional spaces between indoors and outdoors, adequate natural light, views & privacy, sheltered entries and the defining of public and private spaces are our attention and focus.

Each 2 storey unit is 1367 sq. ft. featuring 2 bedrooms plus flex space, 2 1/2 bath. McKernan Duo semi-detached is designed to take full advantage of its southern exposure with substantial glazing that provides light in the winter, passive solar gain in the shoulder seasons and overhangs and sunshades to reduce heating during the summer. Generous windowing on both floors allows for natural light and … Read More »



Straw bale home designed for future

Posted by BLDG in Straw bale. No Comments

7th April

Edmonton Journal – April 7, 2012

Dave and Carol moved into the home in April 2010. Before they found it, they’d been looking at lofts downtown. Parking was an issue. But neither of them wanted a “cookie-cutter” home. They wanted something unique. And they wanted to live centrally in an area with cultural amenities and/or mature trees.

“I just didn’t want to have to drive the Henday to get anywhere,” says Caroline.

Dave happened to see a discussion about straw-bale housing on a local website and contacted Battle Lake Design Group the next day.

They’ve now fallen in love with their two-storey, 1,200-square-foot, Mill Creek-area triplex and are building another bedroom in the unfinished basement. Their family might expand one day.

“We wouldn’t want to move,” says Dave.

Read More: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/homes/Straw+bale+home+designed+future/6398315/story.html


Stevenson Residence

8th February

Stevenson Residence owner-built project, 2011.

Framing and box columns under construction (May 2011)

Framing and box column installation (May 2011)

East side and wrap-around veranda deck

Finished exterior stucco over straw bales

Straw bale interior ‘columns’ frame the terrace doors






Latest Posts

Straw bale, not bombs.

Private Residence

This owner-built, two-storey, straw bale private residence was completed in late 2013. The house sits on a modified concrete grade beam and pile system...

Straw Bale and Energy-Efficient Infill in Edmonton

Supporting infill in established neighbourhoods is part of our mandate in designing and developing straw bale and energy-efficient frame single and multi-family housing. This...

Basic Straw Bale Specifications

Some of the most frequently asked questions regarding straw bale buildings are those related to the type and specifications of the bales that...